designer matthias gschwendtner reuses leftover materials from the wood industry

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3d scanning and robot manufacturing

when matthias gschwendtner shows upit starts with ‘a designer based in berlin and bavaria, working at the intersection of materials and technologies.‘ tapping into these themes, it interweaves computational design, 3D scanningand robotic manufacturing with his studies, allowing a sustainable production process. as he dives into the nuances of sustainabilityhe reveals the calculation log chairthe first object of his new case study new resources.

new sources is a case study using leftover materials from the wood industry through an interconnection of 3D scanning, computer design and robotic manufacturing. raw birch branches are 3D scanned and then virtually processed by algorithms to continuously recalculate all production data for each individual part of an object. due to the irregularity of the material, each object becomes a unique piece,writes the designer of the product.

images courtesy of matthias gschwendtner

designer Mattias Gschwendtner reuses leftover materials from the wood industry
rear view of compute log chair

more than a log chair

the computer log chair leads the series with its precision milled surfaces and edges appearing all around the object and contrasting with the raw surface of the branch to display the intersection between nature and technology. the birch bark remains in part and becomes a natural ornament that retains the original character of the material. the chair criticizes mass consumption and questions the standardization of materials grown naturally in the domestic environment.

six months ago i bought a broken down 22 year old kuka industrial robot, repaired it and set up a temporary workshop in my parents’ garage in ränkam, a small village in rural bavaria.share gschwendtner. from this point, he turns to technology and algorithm to transform his wooden materials into a raw-looking seat, the complement to embrace nature as a pillar of his home. ‘by using branches instead of pre-cut wood, each object is unique and has a different character, even if it is mass-produced. the precision-milled surfaces that appear all around the object communicate the intersection between nature and technology. birch bark partly remains and functions as a natural ornament,writes gschwendtner.

designer Mattias Gschwendtner reuses leftover materials from the wood industry
front view of compute log chair

designer Mattias Gschwendtner reuses leftover materials from the wood industry
side by side view of computational log chair

Organic materials

his research manifested in a seat that resembles the raw bark of a tree, smoothed in parts to give an aura of duality between organic and constructed materials. to tell more about his project, says gschwendtner this constant recalculation makes it possible to use irregularly shaped materials for mass production. ‘the algorithm specially developed for this project analyzes the geometry of each scanned branch and places them in the right place in the virtual space. furthermore, all necessary production data is calculated by the algorithm and sent to an industrial milling robot. the branches will be selected in advance using pattern recognition. different shapes fit different parts.’

designer Mattias Gschwendtner reuses leftover materials from the wood industry
the reckoning wooden chair

designer matthias gschwendtner reuses leftover materials from the wood industry
the reckoning log chair in the garage

designer matthias gschwendtner reuses leftover materials from the wood industry
the industrial robot gschwendtner fixes

designer matthias gschwendtner reuses leftover materials from the wood industry
a close view of the robot

project info:

Last name: calculation log chair

series: new resources

designate: Matthias Gschwendtner

Matthew Burgos | design boom

February 17, 2022

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